- Sunday, April 20th

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

Valerie, the first Black female cartoon character on a regular Saturday morning cartoon.

8 hours ago - 7,306 notes
#valerie #gif



- Sunday, April 20th
Why do we spell the country as ‘Philippines’ but the language as ‘Filipino’?

Philippines is an old English name of the country. It was a Spanish colony, the Spanish name for the country is Islas Filipinas. Then the people of the Philippines decided to choose a new language to become the national language. They chose a language called Tagalog. Tagalog called the Philippines the same way as Spahish.

Subsequently they decided to rename Tagalog to Filipino to highlight its role as a national language. And English just borrowed the name.

/u/czallo

(via sdsimple)

Wrong.

Philippines is the English name of the country after Islas de Filipinas. How they came up with that name from Filipinas I have no clue but the name has has stuck since the American colonization which in turn derives from a colonial name that has stuck with us during our 333 (when Spain eventually got a foothold in 1565 during Miguel Lopez de Legazpi expedition years later after Magellans voyage and arrival in 1521) years of Spanish colonization. It really should be changed because it’s still a colonial name which comes from a Spanish King we never acknowledged. But I already discussed this here and it’s another topic all together, one that will be very long and passionate so I’ll leave it for another day.

The people of the Philippines did not choose Tagalog to be the national language. The Tagalogs did. In which at the time and still is, the seat of power was in Manila, a Tagalog region. Andres Bonifacio himself declared the people and nation as Katagalugan, “the Tagalog nation”, saying that we were all Tagalog which means “people by the river”, when in fact there are hundreds of other ethnic groups besides the Tagalogs and languages in the archipelago, and not all of them live by a river let alone understand one another. 

They never renamed Tagalog as Pilipino. Tagalog is Tagalog. Pilipino is Pilipino, which essentially is Tagalog with very, very few words borrowed from other Philippine languages but essentially Tagalog in grammar and form. The “Pilipino language” is just a mask and fake nationalistic term to hide the fact that it’s essentially just Tagalog to try and settle the disputes held and still held that we have a national language to represent all of us in a sense of nationalistic pride.

In the Philippines the language is spelled Pilipino not Filipino. The country is officially called Republika ng Pilipinas, or in English, The Republic of the Philippines. Filipino is just the English spelling as the letter “f’ and the sound is not from our indigenous alphabet or sounds, it is instead “p”. The “f” sound, along with j, x, c, and z was only introduced during Spanish and American colonization. 

*drops mic*

(via pinoy-culture)

11 hours ago - 1,281 notes
#quote



- Sunday, April 20th

colonelhathi:

The Namesake (2006)




- Saturday, April 19th

A Day Late and a Dollar Short Tonight at 8/EST on Lifetime

Based on Terry McMillan’s book

Starring Whoopi Goldberg, Ving Rhames, Anika Noni Rose, Tichina Arnold, Kimberly Elise and Mekhi Phifer




- Saturday, April 19th

classicladiesofcolor:

Opera legend Reri Grist during the cast recording for the original Broadway production of West Side Story (1957). [Photo Source]

Grist played the role of “Consuela” (first introducing the song “Somewhere”) and was also an understudy for the role of “Rosalia”.




- Saturday, April 19th
Anonymous asked:
You mentioned a book your writing. And I'm sorry this has nothing to do with your blog overall but could you go into a little detail of process to get your book published or have them pay you to write. If it isn't much trouble


Santoine: I don’t believe either of us has ever mentioned writing a book. You may be referring to previous asks about people promoting their work or soliciting suggestions and help. 

But me, specifically, I’m not writing a book. We have links, list of other tumblrs that can help, and resources in our tumblr on how to write about diversity and certain characters.

1 day ago - 1 note
#anon #ask



- Saturday, April 19th

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]




- Thursday, April 17th

thechanelmuse:

Anita (Ardmore, PA) | “Guyanese-American”

“‘Negro’ certainly is a passé term from way back when. We got over ‘Negro,’ we got to be ‘Black and Proud,’ and I’m still Black and proud. I always liked the term ‘Black’ because it doesn’t leave people out. I find ‘Black’ a more encompassing term than ‘African-American.’ ‘African-American’ leaves me out in a way.”

Rosa (Bronx, NY) | “Black Puerto Rican”

“You have a lot of incredible Afro-Latino activists who still don’t say that they’re Black. What they say is that they’re ‘African-descended.’ They say they’re ‘Afro-Latino.’ But a lot of people still won’t say that they’re Black. I think most of people’s issue with calling themselves Black is psychological. It’s fear. If you don’t have to be Black, why would you want to say that? In this country, everything Black is negative. I didn’t start calling myself Black until I was a sophomore in college. But once I learned about the power of the Young Lords and the Black Power Movement, I was like, ‘Why wouldn’t I want to say I was Black?’”

Kenya (Atlanta, GA)“Black”

“As an African-American, many of us trace White blood in our lineage to slavery and my family background is no different. The bottom line is my parents are Black, their parents are Black, my great grandparents are Black, and that makes me Black. I know there are people who are looking and thinking ‘She’s not Black.’ And that’s fine too. At the end of the day, I’m Black because I’m Black.”

Marianna (Baltimore, MD)“Black“

“I get ‘exotic’ a lot ‘cause people can’t really pinpoint. ‘Is she Dominican?’ ‘Is she Trini?’ ‘Is she Black and Filipino?’ ‘Is she Black and Japanese?’ It’s almost like they can’t tell so that’s alluring. All they know is it’s not ‘just Black’ and that’s all that matters. They think it’s ‘Black and something,’ but it’s that ‘something’ that they’re more focused on and that holds their attention a little bit more.”

Ariel (Brooklyn, New York)“Black”

“In Cuba, some people don’t see me as Black. Even Black people will deny my Blackness. Since I was a child, people gave me different names like ‘el chino’ because when I was younger I was really looking more like a Chinese. And then they called me names connected with my race and my ethnicity like ‘mulatto’ or ‘moro.’ They tried to emphasize that I was different because my skin is Black, but my hair is ‘White.’ So for many people in Cuba, I am mulatto or I am interracial – they don’t consider me Black. I think it goes back to the plantation days when slaves had a child with the owner, and for being less dark, that child would have a better job and a better position in society. Cuba has a long history of Whiteness in that sense – many Black people consider themselves as moving forward in society when they marry somebody White or when their kids are less dark.”

Soledad (New York, NY)“Black Latina”

“People ask me ‘What are you?’ all the time. People tweet me that question. I used to take great offense, like immediately get annoyed; partly because I didn’t think the question came from a very good place. I think I read it as questioning my value and my reasons for being wherever I was. But now, I think it’s two-fold: One, I think that because I’m a journalist, people are really just trying to understand who I am. ‘You’re somebody I see on TV, but I don’t know you in person, so who are you?’ So often, it’s not really about the question. It’s about ‘What side are you on?’ and ‘What perspective do you bring?’ Then two, I think that part of my job as a journalist is to educate people about stories and some of these stories I’m a part of. I’m part of ‘Black in America’ even in the context of who is the filter of the story.  So I’ve really gotten much better at taking that question and I’ve stopped hating it so much. It’s my job to elaborate and explain for people who I am. My mom is Afro-Cuban. My dad is White and Australian. I’m Black. I’m Latina.”

Malene(Brooklyn, NY) | “Black of Mixed Heritage”

“Trinidad is a cosmopolitan nation, probably more racially diverse than the rest of the Caribbean. We have descendants of European enslavers, freed Africans and enslaved Africans, Chinese and other Asian migrants, and a small East Indian population. You have all these mixtures and the mixtures are acknowledged. So I’m not Black in Trinidad; they consider me to be Chinese creole. They use all kinds of terms to identify people based on their racial makeup – ‘Indian,’ ‘negro,’ ‘creole,’ ‘Chinese creole,’ ‘Spanish,’ ‘coolie,’ ‘dougla.’ A ‘coolie,’ for example, is an East Indian. ‘Dougla’ is the mix of Black and East Indian. There’s really no difference between the two. It’s like saying ‘nigger’ and ‘nigga.’ To me, it’s all offensive. All of it comes from hateful places.”

Liliane (São Paulo, Brasil) | “Black”

“In Brasil, people of my color can be considered either Black or White, but it would depend on the situation, and it would also depend on the social and educational condition of the people who are seeing you. So what happens is that when someone of lower socioeconomic status sees me, they would treat me as White. But if I go to a high-class restaurant, where the people are of a higher status than me, people treat me as Black. Usually the general thought for Brasilians is that the place for Black people is in the kitchen or on the soccer field or in samba. So if you are not in one of those places, it’s like ‘Who are you and who allowed you to be here?’ And you can feel it.”

Adrian (Brooklyn, NY) | “Black Puerto-Rican”

“I think part of the misconception about Blackness is that it’s a skin color. For me personally, it’s just my way of life. Whether it’s my bloodline and family history, or the neighborhood I grew up in and the people I grew up with, or something as simple as the food that I eat, there’s so many different ways that I can identify with Blackness to where if somebody were to ask me, “Adrian, what makes you Black?” I would probably just counter the question with, “What doesn’t make me Black?” It’s not even something that I’m trying to prove. It’s just in me.”

Lauren (Philadelphia, PA) | “Black and Italian / African-American“

“The one-drop rule is not about letting society tell you who you are, but about understanding the structures around you that are already in place. It’s about understanding the complexities of Black identity and how you fit into that. At the same time, it doesn’t take away from your individuality and the beauty of your personal background or our collective history.”




A dark area rising on the Titanic - A descendant of the only black family on the Titanic said she is determined to keep the memory of her ancestors alive giving them their rightful place in history. Marlie Alberts said she is a descendant of the H...

prominent-afro-history:

prominent-afro-history.tumblr.com/archive




- Wednesday, April 16th
Anonymous asked:
My kids school is throwing a cinco de mayo festival next month. This is a mostly white school in a highly gentrified neighborhood. I have attended some of their events. They are mostly ran by white people. I feel like this festivity is just another theme party for them. Cinco de mayo is not really observed by most Mexicans. I'm afraid they're going to their version of my culture. I want to address the faculty that this very offensive. How should I go about it? What should I say?


Latin@ followers, do ya’ll have any suggestions? 

4 days ago - 6 notes
#anon #ask